1 mile west of the Chicago Premium Outlet Mall (800) 810 3100
By Attorney Rick Law of the Estate, Asset, and Retirement Tax Law Firm at Law Elder Law in West suburban Aurora.  When we are asked by families to recommend a skilled care facility, our old refrain is; “Choose the care, not the curtains!”  In other words, investigate what it’s like to live in a facility – don’t just judge the place by the décor and the architecture. This is an excerpt from an interview I had back in 2009 with Anthony Clark, R.N., then Clinical Nurse Manager and Physician Liaison for Countryside Care Center (now Symphony of Orchard Valley). After telling me some of his favorite lawyer jokes, he showed me a whole new way to think about long-term care nursing. Q: Anthony, why do you serve here at Countryside? A: I had wanted to get an operating room position, but due to circumstances, I decided to apply here.  Actually, an operating room job can be easier, because you never get attached to the patients—and most of the time… you win!—the patient gets well.  But in a nursing home facility, you experience just the opposite.  You spend long periods of time building relationships with people, and then you face the reality of their inevitable death.  You have to learn how to deal with your grief. That’s one of the real challenges of being a part of a long term care setting.  Ultimately, you will lose someone you care about.  I try to focus on providing our residents with comfort, care, and friendship.  I have a lot of friends who live here. Q: How do you and your staff find job satisfaction working in the nursing home at Countryside? A: One of the greatest things we have here at Countryside is our Reminiscence Boulevard; that’s our memory enrichment wing.  Our staff go out of their way to love and care for our residents.  They smile, joke, sing, and dance together.  The staff on the Boulevard take pride in what they do.  They do their work well, and the residents and the residents’ families come to trust each one of them. Q: What is one of the big reasons that you chose to work at Countryside? A: Formerly, I did work in a fancy and totally remodeled short-term rehabilitation center.  Before the new construction, it had been an older, smaller facility.  The nursing team had been able to provide the highest quality of care.  But, after the reconstruction, we had a state-of-the-art building in which it was physically impossible for us to safely serve our residents.  Here, we can see all of the rooms from either end of the hallway. Q: What is a special point of pride for you? A: The staff must be emotionally up each time they come through the door, or it will show to our residents.  I am proud that every day, this care team shows up emotionally ready for the day. Too many families needlessly lose everything they have.  Don’t let that be you.  If you need help paying the overwhelming cost of long term care, give our office a call at 800-310-3100.  Your first consultation is absolutely free.  We’ll let you know what steps you need to take, right now, to protect yourself and your family.  Call now, because when you’re out of money, you’re out of options! Sincerely, Rick L. Law, Attorney, Estate Planner for Retirees. 8 times named the #1 Illinois elder law estate planning attorney by Leading Lawyer Magazine, Rick has been quoted in the Wall Street Journal, AARP Magazine, TheStreet.com, and numerous newspapers and articles. Rick is the lead attorney for Law Elder Law, LLP, focusing in Estate Planning, Guardianship, and Nursing Home Solutions. His goal is to give retirees an informed edge when it comes to dealing with an uncertain future.  Get flexible retirement strategies that work during good times and bad, plus information on how you can save your home and assets from being used to pay for long term care.  Call 800-310-3100 for your free consultation now!  
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By Rick Law, founder and managing partner of Law Elder Law in Aurora, Illinois.  At LEL, we know that the world has changed. Thankfully, we can help; We make the complex easy to understand. The Federal Nursing Home Reform Act lays out the rights of the residents. Under the federal act, a nursing home facility is required to protect and promote the rights of each resident, including, but not limited to the following rights:
  1. The resident has the right to exercise rights as a resident of the facility and as a citizen or resident of the United States. This means the resident is free to make financial and medical decisions.
  2. The resident has the right to be free of interference, coercion, discrimination, and reprisal from the facility in exercising those rights.
  3. In the case of a resident adjudged incompetent under the laws of a state by a court of competent jurisdiction, the rights of the resident are exercised by the person appointed under state law to act on the resident’s behalf.
  4. In the case of a resident who has not been adjudged incompetent by the state court, any legal-surrogate designated in accordance with state law may exercise the resident’s rights to the extent provided by state law.
The act also states the following:
  1. The facility must inform the resident both orally and in writing in a language that the resident understands of the resident’s rights and all rules and regulations governing resident conduct and responsibilities during the stay in the facility.
  2. The resident or legal representative has the right upon an oral or written request to access all records pertaining to the resident, including current clinical records within 24 hours (excluding weekends and holidays); and after receipt of records for inspection, to purchase at a cost not to exceed the community standard photocopies of the records or any portions of them upon request and two working days advance notice to the facility.
  3. The resident has the right to be fully informed in language that the resident can understand of total health status, including but not limited to, medical condition.
  4. The resident has the right to refuse treatment, to refuse to participate in experimental research, and to formulate an advance directive.
  5. The facility also must inform residents that are entitled to Medicaid benefits, in writing, at the time of admission to the nursing facility or when the resident becomes eligible for Medicaid of the items and services that are included in nursing facility services under the state plan and for which the resident may not be charged; those other items and services that the facility offers and for which the resident may be charged, and the amount of charges for those services; and inform each resident when changes are made to the items and services specified above.
  If you’re ready to start getting your estate in order and secure your assets for the “worst-case” scenario, please give our office a call at 800-310-3100. Your first consultation is absolutely free.  We’ll let you know what steps you need to take, right now, to protect yourself and your family.  Call now. Sincerely, Rick L. Law, Attorney, Estate Planner for Retirees. 8 times named the #1 Illinois elder law estate planning attorney by Leading Lawyer Magazine, Ric has been quoted in the Wall Street Journal, AARP Magazine, TheStreet.com, and numerous newspapers and articles. Rick is the lead attorney for Law Elder Law, LLP, focusing in Estate Planning, Guardianship, and Nursing Home Solutions. His goal is to give retirees an informed edge when it comes to dealing with an uncertain future.  Get flexible retirement strategies that work during good times and bad, plus information on how you can save your home and assets from being used to pay for long term care.  Call 800-310-3100 for your free consultation now!
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By Rick Law of the Estate Planning Center at Law Elder Law.  Rick Law and daughter attorney Diana Law are the lead attorneys at the multi-generational law firm of Law Elder Law. Serving seniors and their families through elder law services, estate planning, guardianship, probate, wills and trusts, and much more in Kane, Kendall, DuPage, Will and Cook counties in Illinois. A client walks into a lawyer’s office and says, “I have been going over and taking care of my elderly mother for the past few months for a few hours a day. Now she’s been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s, and this is going to take up a lot more of my time and energy. I may need for her to move in with me and my husband, and I am going to need to start charging her. I want to set up a personal-care agreement for her.” In this situation it is not too late to create a valid personal-care agreement even though care has already been provided for free, because at this point the client is saying that the care needs have intensified and it’s time for them to start being paid. The key for Medicaid eligibility is that someone can never be compensated for care that was being provided gratuitously. In the Medicaid context, care provided without a properly drafted and medically justified personal-care agreement is presumptively gratuitous. For example, the parents lived with their son for two years and he did many things for them gratuitously, and then suddenly he says he wants to receive payment. He says that not only does he want to receive payment going forward, he wants to be compensated for all that previous care. That will be a big issue for Medicaid eligibility for the affected loved one, because a retroactive payment will be viewed as a gift and could create a substantial period of ineligibility for the person needing Medicaid. The reality is that a lot of times people incrementally get into these situations. So if you the individual seek out lawyers early in that process, your lawyer would probably want to have them set up a low-level personal-care agreement. As the care increases, so would the amount that caregivers are being paid proportionally to the amount of hours they’re working over time. An elder law attorney will have ancillary documentation in place to validate the changes of care level needed. If your loved one has memory problems and you’re afraid of the consequences that may bring, give our office a call today at 800-310-3100.  Your first consultation is absolutely free.  We’ll let you know what steps you need to take, right now, to protect yourself and your family.  Call now. Sincerely, Rick L. Law, Attorney, Estate Planner for Retirees. Rick was named the #1 Illinois elder law estate planning attorney by Leading Lawyer Magazine. He has been quoted in the Wall Street Journal, AARP Magazine, TheStreet.com, and numerous newspapers and articles. Rick is the lead attorney for Law Elder Law, LLP, focusing in Estate Planning, Guardianship, and Nursing Home Solutions. His goal is to give retirees an informed edge when it comes to dealing with an uncertain future.  Get flexible retirement strategies that work during good times and bad, plus information on how you can save your home and assets from being used to pay for long term care.  Call 800-310-3100 for your free consultation now!
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By elder law attorney Rick Law, founder of the Estate Planning Center at Law Elder Law, senior advocates and elder care lawyers in the Western Chicago suburb of Aurora, IL. Memory loss can manifest itself in many ways.  All too often, it is ignored by both the individual and their family members.  After all no one wants to face the threat of a debilitating illness, so the easy alternative is to ignore, or shift the blame. However, ignoring the problem can cause even more problems for the affected individual. A quick and accurate diagnosis may be instrumental in developing a plan to cope with a disease such as Alzheimer’s disease or dementia. When memory loss is first detected, one of the authors refers to this as “smoke in the kitchen.” In many cases, there literally is smoke in the kitchen because one of the most common dangers of memory loss is that the senior forgets and leaves a burner on or does not turn off the oven, and eventually starts a fire in the kitchen. Often seniors will either ignore their memory loss or will attempt to hide the behavior. In many cases, they are aware of their worsening condition but are afraid of being put in a nursing home. Once the memory loss has been detected by family or friends, the next stage is coming to the decision that the senior is “unsafe alone” and needs aid. It is not unusual for the senior to resist and fight to avoid assisted-living situations. While men seem to be more likely to fight back since control can be a bigger issue for a man facing Alzheimer’s, it is not out of the norm for women to plant their feet and say, “I am not leaving my home.” On the Alzheimer’s journey, the goal for many seniors and their families is to keep the seniors in their home (or in the home of an adult child) for as long as possible. This will typically necessitate the need for in-home care. If your loved one has memory problems and you’re afraid of the consequences that may bring, give our office a call today at 800-310-3100.  Your first consultation is absolutely free.  We’ll let you know what steps you need to take, right now, to protect yourself and your family.  Call now. Sincerely, Rick L. Law, Attorney, Estate Planner for Retirees. Rick was named the #1 Illinois elder law estate planning attorney for the past 8 years in a row by Leading Lawyer Magazine. He has been quoted in the Wall Street Journal, AARP Magazine, TheStreet.com, and numerous newspapers and articles. Rick is the lead attorney for Law Elder Law, LLP, focusing in Estate Planning, Guardianship, and Nursing Home Solutions. His goal is to give retirees an informed edge when it comes to dealing with an uncertain future.  Get flexible retirement strategies that work during good times and bad, plus information on how you can save your home and assets from being used to pay for long term care.  Call 800-310-3100 for your free consultation now!
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By Senior Advocate and Estate Planning Attorney Rick Law of the Estate Planning Center at Law Elder Law, a Multi-Generation Law Firm serving DuPage, Kane , Kendall, Will, Cook and other Counties in Illinois. Alzheimer’s disease has become all too prevalent among our nation’s seniors.  Worse yet, every family will inevitably feel the shockwaves caused by this heartbreaking and devastating diagnosis.  According to Alzheimer’s Disease International, nearly 44 million people worldwide have Alzheimer’s or a related dementia. In many cases, the caregiver ends up suffering right along with the alzheimer’s patient.  This was recently brought home for me after watching a CBS news special report about a man who postponed his own retirement in order to pay for his wife’s alzheimer’s care. Here is the story of Mike and Carol: Mark is the sole caregiver for his wife Carol, who has Alzheimer’s disease. When we first met Mike and Carol Daly eight years ago, Mike was the sole caregiver after her Alzheimer’s diagnosis. He often took her to work with him. Today, at age 73, he’s still working. But now, as Carol declines, a health care worker cares for her during the day. He said if he wanted to retire, he couldn’t afford to care for Carol. “That’s my fear, I could not swing it financially. I would have to dedicate my whole life to taking care of Carol, because I wouldn’t be able to afford home care. Not enough money.” A recent survey documented the financial sacrifices Alzheimer’s caregivers are often forced to make. Beth Kallmyer with the Alzheimer’s Association said the participants were having to make difficult choices in order to make ends meet. “They were having to make choices about putting food on the table, or going to the doctor, or taking money out of their retirement funds in order to make sure the person had care.” The survey also found almost half of caregivers were forced to cut back on their own expenses. For Mike, that means working and saving so Carol can stay in their home. The alternative would be to put Carol in a nursing home, which Mike says he just can’t do. “I have an obligation to her, the love I have for her,” he said, crying. “I can’t abandon her.” The cost of caring for someone with Alzheimer’s is a lot more than financial. “I’m dying, I really think I am,” Mike said. “My blood pressure is like 200 over 100. They wanted to put me in the hospital. I can’t go in the hospital … What do I do with Carol?” His blood pressure is now under control with increased medication. According to the Alzheimer’s Association, about 2 of 3 people incorrectly believe that Medicare may or will help them cover nursing home costs. That may help explain why only about 3 percent of U.S. adults have insurance for long-term care. If your loved one has memory problems and you’re afraid of the consequences that may bring, give our office a call today at 800-310-3100.  Your first consultation is absolutely free.  We’ll let you know what steps you need to take, right now, to protect yourself and your family.  Call now. Sincerely, Rick L. Law, Attorney, Estate Planner for Retirees. Rick was named the #1 Illinois elder law estate planning attorney by Leading Lawyer Magazine. He has been quoted in the Wall Street Journal, AARP Magazine, TheStreet.com, and numerous newspapers and articles. Rick is the lead attorney for Law Elder Law, LLP, focusing in Estate Planning, Guardianship, and Nursing Home Solutions. His goal is to give retirees an informed edge when it comes to dealing with an uncertain future.  Get flexible retirement strategies that work during good times and bad, plus information on how you can save your home and assets from being used to pay for long term care.  Call 800-310-3100 for your free consultation now!
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By Estate Planning attorney Rick Law of the Estate Planning Center at Law Elder Law – senior advocates and elder care attorneys located in Aurora, IL Medicare is primarily designed to provide care for people over the age of 65 who can get well, and is supposed to pay for acute care assuming the person needing the care is placed as an inpatient. “Inpatient” is a key term and has become a controversial issue. Hospitals are starting to have people who are there to undergo tests, but these people are determined to be “under observation,” which means they are on their own when it comes to paying their medical bills. Medicare helps pay for inpatient care in the hospital or skilled nursing facilities following a hospital stay. But, it’s not just any hospital stay; basically, a person has to have three midnights in the hospital before qualifying for skilled nursing care in a rehab center or home health care.  A person could actually be in the hospital for multiple days, having multiple tests, and seeing multiple doctors, and but if they have not been “admitted”, the patient is classified as being merely “under observation”.  They need to be prepared to pay multiple bills! Medicare is concerned about care only as long as a person can get well.  There are a few exceptions to that, due to political lobbies that were strong enough to make changes. For instance, Medicare cares for people who have amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig’s disease), and about people with chronic renal failure. Why? Because these diseases or conditions had a big enough lobby to get the Medicare law changed.  Medicare does not care about Alzheimer’s disease and was never designed for long-term care. Although Medicare can sometimes cover up to 100 days in a skilled nursing facility, it is intended for patients who need recovery or rehabilitation from surgery or illness. For Medicare to pay for a stay in a nursing home, patients must continue to recover during their stay. Individuals in the middle to late stages of Alzheimer’s typically require custodial care instead of rehabilitative care. “Custodial care” means assistance with preparing meals, bathing, grooming, toileting, and other activities of normal daily life. It may appear that this is skilled care, and even involves measures to keep individuals from harming themselves or others, but Medicare is not going to pay for this custodial care. Too many families needlessly lose everything they have.  Don’t let that be you.  If you need help paying the overwhelming cost of long term care, give our office a call at 800-310-3100.  Your first consultation is absolutely free.  We’ll let you know what steps you need to take, right now, to protect yourself and your family.  Call now, because when you’re out of money, you’re out of options! Sincerely, Rick L. Law, Attorney, Estate Planner for Retirees. Rick was named the #1 Illinois elder law estate planning attorney by Leading Lawyer Magazine. He has been quoted in the Wall Street Journal, AARP Magazine, TheStreet.com, and numerous newspapers and articles. Rick is the lead attorney for Law Elder Law, LLP, focusing in Estate Planning, Guardianship, and Nursing Home Solutions. His goal is to give retirees an informed edge when it comes to dealing with an uncertain future.  Get flexible retirement strategies that work during good times and bad, plus information on how you can save your home and assets from being used to pay for long term care.  Call 800-310-3100 for your free consultation now!
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By Elder Law Attorney and Senior Estate Planner Rick Law, managing partner at the Estate Planning Center of Law Elder Law in west suburban Aurora, IL. Medicare is the federal medical insurance plan for senior citizens and individuals with disabilities, but Medicare does not cover the kind of long-term care that those inflicted with Alzheimer’s disease require. Medicare provides care for individuals who are blind, have disabilities, or are over the age of 65 and needacute medical care. “Acute medical care” means an individual has been diagnosed with an illness or other medical issue where there is a high probability that the individual can recover and return to a normal life. When Medicare was born in 1965, the average male died before ever reaching 65 years of age and the average female lived to be about 70. So when Medicare was first designed, it was created in a society where most people would never qualify for it or, if they did qualify, they would qualify for a relatively short amount of time. Looking to the other side of the equation, many people believe that Medicaid is just about paying for care for poor people. Medicaid was designed to be the part of the social safety net that provided health care for people who were too poor to be able to have their own health care. It was limited in what it was going to do because it was “means tested”, meaning that it was only available if someone qualified under certain poverty limitations. In 1965, there was no such thing as assisted-living facilities. Assisted living is for a person who has gotten to the point in life to have chronic care conditions—chronic meaning the person is never going to get well. That is an important difference between Medicare and Medicaid.  Medicare does not cover chronic medical care services for most individuals who are suffering from a long-term illness or medical problem where there is a high probability that they will not recover and will not return to a normal life. Many people believe that Medicare will provide them with long term care benefits if they need to be in an assisted-living facility or a nursing home, but they are mistaken! Too many families needlessly lose everything they have.  Don’t let that be you.  If you need help paying the overwhelming cost of long term care, give our office a call at 800-310-3100.  Your first consultation is absolutely free.  We’ll let you know what steps you need to take, right now, to protect yourself and your family.  Call now, because when you’re out of money, you’re out of options! Sincerely, Rick L. Law, Attorney, Estate Planner for Retirees. Rick was named the #1 Illinois elder law estate planning attorney by Leading Lawyer Magazine. He has been quoted in the Wall Street Journal, AARP Magazine, TheStreet.com, and numerous newspapers and articles. Rick is the lead attorney for Law Elder Law, LLP, focusing in Estate Planning, Guardianship, and Nursing Home Solutions. His goal is to give retirees an informed edge when it comes to dealing with an uncertain future.  Get flexible retirement strategies that work during good times and bad, plus information on how you can save your home and assets from being used to pay for long term care.    Call 800-310-3100 for your free consultation now!
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 By Elder Law and Estate Planning Lawyer Rick Law.  Law Elder Law provides legal services for seniors in the West Suburbs of Chicago, Illinois. When it comes down to it, the health-care system isn’t a whole lot different from a lottery system. If someone gets a diagnosis that has a  Medicare reimbursement code, then Medicare cares about that person’s care and will cover it. If someone gets a diagnosis that’s not covered by Medicare, Medicare does not care about that person’s care and will not pay. There’s a story of two sisters of the same relative age, sharing the same genes and even living on the same street. One sister had heart issues and was able to rely on Medicare. The other sister was not so “lucky” and had Alzheimer’s disease. The unlucky sister was unable to use Medicare to pay for her needed long-term care. In essence, the first sister won the diagnosis lottery. Medicare cares about helping seniors to not die of heart attacks or strokes. For the sister that had a heart problem, there was a Medicare reimbursement code to take care of almost everything that she needed: medication, health services, rehab services, hospital services, doctor services. She was provided an enormous amount of care—probably half a million dollars or more because there was a Medicare reimbursement code for the diagnosis that she had. Medicare didn’t completely abandon the sister with Alzheimer’s. When she got a urinary tract infection and had to go to a hospital as an inpatient, Medicare paid for her acute care. Part B paid for doctor services.  Part D helped pay for medications, such as Aricept and Risperdal. But look at what’s not covered. Someone who has memory issues and starts to need assistance will not be able to access Medicare benefits for care. When the sister with Alzheimer’s started to have memory issues, she was living at home. One day she decided to turn on the water in the bathtub upstairs and she didn’t turn it off. She didn’t turn it off for a couple of days. At this point it became obvious that the sister was no longer safe in a normal environment and somebody needed to be overseeing her activities of daily living. She needed in-home care, which is not covered by Medicare. Too many families needlessly lose everything they have.  Don’t let that be you.  If you need help paying the overwhelming cost of long term care, give our office a call at 800-310-3100.  Your first consultation is absolutely free.  We’ll let you know what steps you need to take, right now, to protect yourself and your family.  Call now, because when you’re out of money, you’re out of options! Sincerely, Rick L. Law, Attorney, Estate Planner for Retirees. Rick was named the #1 Illinois elder law estate planning attorney by Leading Lawyer Magazine. He has been quoted in the Wall Street Journal, AARP Magazine, TheStreet.com, and numerous newspapers and articles. Rick is the lead attorney for Law Elder Law, LLP, focusing in Estate Planning, Guardianship, and Nursing Home Solutions. His goal is to give retirees an informed edge when it comes to dealing with an uncertain future.  Get flexible retirement strategies that work during good times and bad, plus information on how you can save your home and assets from being used to pay for long term care.   Call 800-310-3100 for your free consultation now!
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 By Attorney Rick Law, managing partner at the Estate Planning Center of Law Elder Law in West Suburban Chicagoland. The Oaks, a United Methodist Continuous Care Retirement Community, is located in Orangeburg, near Charleston, South Carolina. What attracted us was the exciting work being done there to give people diagnosed with dementia the ability to live at home with dignity while providing peace of mind for family members and caregivers. The Oaks provides traditional senior services and care combined with a look to the future, recognizing that there is extraordinary pressure to move long-term care from the institutional facility back into the community. The visionary leader of the Oaks is the Rev. James McGee, CEO. When we met with him and Stacie Pierce, director of the technology/caregiving solution program called Live at Home Technologies, they had recently returned from meeting with IT wizards in Israel. The purpose of their trip was further their research, development, and implementation of innovative technologies that will provide remote in-home care for people affected by dementia. Some of the activities monitored include motion of an individual or lack of motion, bed and chair activities, medication access, patterns of movement through the home, daily body weight, daily blood pressure and blood glucose, time spent in the bathroom, the opening and closing of interior and exterior doors, and appliance usage. I asked Stacie to tell us about how technology is helping seniors live at home longer, and here’s what she said: “This is something I’m passionate about. I’m a caregiver first and foremost. We take care of people, and we use technology to enhance that care so that when they’re not safe anymore, they understand what their other choices are.  There are more than 70 million baby boomers about to hit the market. We need to have choices available. When you talk about Alzheimer’s, it’s an epidemic, and people are living longer and the disease is being diagnosed earlier. Technology gives people more living options. We help people live at home with the support of honest and reliable family members who live nearby. One family lives 90 minutes from our facility. The daughter-in-law and son-in-law live about 500 yards away from the two disabled family members. The father has Alzheimer’s and his daughter, who lives with him, is 62.  The daughter is developmentally delayed and has an IQ equivalent to a three- or four-year-old. The wife recently died of a massive heart attack, most likely due to caregiver fatigue.  She had been taking care of both her husband with Alzheimer’s and her disabled 62-year-old daughter. So now you have a family who is asking, what can we do? The man was born in this house and the daughter was raised there. They have been a part of each other’s lives for 62 years, and they have their patterns. If we separate them, she’ll go to an institution and he’ll go to assisted living or a nursing home, and they’ll both probably die much sooner. We examined their living patterns. We worked with the family to figure out what the rules will be.  He still likes to go out and get the mail. They live on a busy road, so we put a door sensor on the door. Then I started thinking – if he leaves the door open, how am I going to know if he came back in? So I put a floor mat down on the inside. So if he opens the door and there’s no pressure on the floor sensor within 20 minutes, then I know he didn’t come back in. We’ve had that system in place for three years now.  Anytime an alert is sent out, it goes to one of the other family members who live nearby. The daughter had a history of falling in the bathtub. So we established a rule that if there’s pressure on a mat in the bathroom for more than 30 minutes, then an alert is sent to one of the family members. We can set it up so that an alert goes to one of the family members, on their cell phone or their computer, and then they can connect to the house, turn on the camera inside, and actually view to see if someone is on the floor. We here at the Oaks do not have access to the cameras—only family members do. You can’t have technology without some sort of caregivers, as well. Nonetheless, the technology can make the caregiver’s life more livable. Otherwise there’s a much higher likelihood that the caregiver will die before the person being cared for. I met with a man yesterday who’s in his mid-80s and still an active businessman. His wife has Alzheimer’s and he needs help with care. He says, “I still enjoy my work. I have to go out of town to do business. I can’t take care of my wife 24/7.” He wants to have a solution so his wife can continue to live at home and to provide the family with some sanity at the same time. We can put in a system that will allow him to go out and play poker and still keep his wife safe by providing alerts to him or other caregivers. Most people don’t even know that these types of solutions are available. I have been certified as an assistive technology practitioner and an aging-in-place specialist. This type of training allows us to work with homebuilders and remodelers to design appropriate systems within residences.” Too many families needlessly lose everything they have.  Don’t let that be you.  If you need help paying the overwhelming cost of long term care, give our office a call at 800-310-3100.  Your first consultation is absolutely free.  We’ll let you know what steps you need to take, right now, to protect yourself and your family.  Call now, because when you’re out of money, you’re out of options! Sincerely, Rick L. Law, Attorney, Estate Planner for Retirees. Rick was named the #1 Illinois elder law estate planning attorney by Leading Lawyer Magazine. He has been quoted in the Wall Street Journal, AARP Magazine, TheStreet.com, and numerous newspapers and articles. Rick is the lead attorney for Law Elder Law, LLP, focusing in Estate Planning, Guardianship, and Nursing Home Solutions. His goal is to give retirees an informed edge when it comes to dealing with an uncertain future.  Get flexible retirement strategies that work during good times and bad, plus information on how you can save your home and assets from being used to pay for long term care. Call 800-310-3100 for your free consultation now!
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By Rick Law, Chicagoland Area Attorney and Estate Planner Do you know where to turn for assistance when crisis or illness strikes? We at Law Elder Law have many connections with care facilities and services in your community.  We are here to help you find care services that are the right fit for you and your family.  From medical professionals to nearby long-term care facilities, we work closely with our clients to find the best solution for their unique needs.  We may be able to point you in the right direction so you can visit one or two places and choose what’s right for you. As you decide on a nursing home, there are many different factors to consider.  Is it close to family so visiting is easy?  And of course, does the cost fit into your budget? With many facilities running $5,000, $7,000, or even $10,000 every single month, the costs can be daunting.  We are here to help you put together a comprehensive plan to pay for care without losing everything you’ve worked so hard for. Too many families needlessly lose everything they have.  Don’t let that be you.  If you need help paying the overwhelming cost of long term care, give our office a call at 800-310-3100.  Your first consultation is absolutely free.  We’ll let you know what steps you need to take, right now, to protect yourself and your family.  Call now, because when you’re out of money, you’re out of options! Sincerely, Rick L. Law, Attorney and Estate Planner for Retirees Rick was named the #1 Illinois elder law estate planning attorney by Leading Lawyer Magazine. He has been quoted in the Wall Street Journal, AARP Magazine, TheStreet.com, and numerous newspapers and articles. Rick is the lead attorney for Law Elder Law, LLP, focusing in Estate Planning, Guardianship, and Nursing Home Solutions. His goal is to give retirees an informed edge when it comes to dealing with an uncertain future.  Get flexible retirement strategies that work during good times and bad, plus information on how you can save your home and assets from being used to pay for long term care.  Appointments available in Chicago, Aurora, Oak Brook, Schaumburg, and Joliet.  Call 800-310-3100 for your free consultation now!
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